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Category: Champion for Kids

10 Simple Ways Kids Can Volunteer Infograph

10 Simple Ways Kids Can Volunteer Infograph

Volunteering Ideas for Kids of All Ages

If you’re looking for ways your family or kids could give back in your community, check this infograph! Showing and teaching kids how to volunteer in their local communities is a great way to help them learn new skills while learning about life’s diversity. Of course, each suggestion can be tailored to match your child’s age & level, or could be used as a family activity.

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Feeding Kids in Middle Tennessee

Feeding Kids in Middle Tennessee

Food Bank Receives Tyson Foods Donations as Part of Hunger Heroes Campaign

Each week, the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee serves more than 6,700 hungry children at more than 100 schools throughout Tennessee. That means, every year, they feed enough kids to fill the Tennessee Titans stadium more than five times. 

As a part of the 2014 Hunger Heroes campaign, Champions for Kids partnered with Tyson Foods to bring 30,000 pounds of chicken to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.
As a part of the 2014 Hunger Heroes campaign, Champions for Kids partnered with Tyson Foods to bring 30,000 pounds of chicken to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.

Wow.

This feat (because it is truly a feat) takes a community effort, which is why the food bank works with more than 450 partner agencies in a service area covering 46 counties. Last year, their 19 truck fleet covered 533,374 miles rescuing and delivering food to those agencies. That’s enough miles to travel around the earth over 21.4 times.

As a part of the 2014 Hunger Heroes campaign, Champions for Kids partnered with Tyson Foods to bring 30,000 pounds of chicken to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee.

On February 24, 2015, staff members from Champions for Kids, Tyson Foods and Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee gathered together as a Tyson Foods truck pulled up to deliver pounds upon pounds of food to help fight hunger. Tyson Foods has donated over 100 million pounds of protein since 2000, and continues to serve as a champion against hunger in the USA.

Working with these organizations is truly a privilege, because it means coming together to acknowledge and stand against deeply harrowing, often crippling challenges like food insecurity.

Yes, Champions for Kids has the goal of helping 20 million kids by 2020, but our organization does not exist in a vacuum. Only through deliberate collaboration and a shared value of bettering communities can organizations, schools and individuals make a difference.

What do you think? Do you agree/disagree? Let us know in the comments! 

Champions for Kids Awards $10,000 for SIMPLE Giving

Champions for Kids Awards $10,000 for SIMPLE Giving

SIMPLE Giving Brings Funds to School Districts

Nothing brightens up the day like being able to call SIMPLE Giving participants, who took part of the Fall Kids Essentials campaign, and letting them know their school district has won a grant to help kids in need.

Thanks to General Mills, Unilever and Walmart, Champions for Kids was able to award over $10,000 (total) to school districts across the USA. Each award will go to help kids thrive by providing resources, food or other essential items. Congratulations to the following winners:

1st place – $5,000
Parson Hills Elementary

2nd place – $3,000
Johnson City Schools

3rd place – $2,000
Arkansas Unity Hawks

Champions for Kids Awards $11,000 for Stocking Stuffer Challenge

Champions for Kids Awards $11,000 for Stocking Stuffer Challenge

Stocking Stuffer Challenge Brings Resources to Kids

For many, Christmas stockings are filled with fun (sometimes delicious) small gifts. Many kids however, especially those in foster care or insecure living situations, don’t even have a stocking to call their own.

In December 2014, Coca-Cola and Champions for Kids issued a challenge to Arkansas schools and youth-based organizations: fill Christmas stockings with essential items for children. Eleven schools or organizations with the most donated stockings received a $1,000 to help kids.

When Champions for Kids called the winners, the reactions and excitement was contagious. Check it out!

Congratulations to the following schools and non-profits:
Heber Springs High School | Root Elementary School | Prism Education Center | Northwest Arkansas Branch of the NAACP | Arkadelphia School District | R.E. Baker Elementary | Southside School District | First Methodist Church Food Pantry | NWA Chapter Youth M.O.V.E | Apple Seeds, Inc. | Peace at Home

Fighting Hunger by the Truckload

Fighting Hunger by the Truckload

Have you ever wondered what 30,000 lbs of chicken looks like? Probably not. As part of the Hunger Heroes campaign in 2014, Tyson Foods partnered with us to donated product to food banks in North Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia.

Donating 30,000 lbs of protein to Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest NC
Donating 30,000 lbs of protein to Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest NC

On Feb. 10, 2015, staff members from Champions for Kids and Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest NC got to see what truckloads (literally!) of donated protein looked like.

The Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest NC fights daily to meet the challenges of hunger in its community. In fact:

  • 1 in 6 people living in Northwest North Carolina turn to Second Harvest Food Bank’s network for food assistance.
  • 32 percent of those who receive food assistance through Second Harvest Food Bank’s network of partner food assistance programs are children under the age of 18…(read more here)

Being chronically hungry can have disastrous affects on childhood development, education, community development and more.

This is what 30,000 lbs of chicken looks like.
This is what 30,000 lbs of chicken looks like.

By joining organizations likeTyson Foods (which has donated over 100 million lbs of protein since 2000, by the way), Second Harvest Food Bank, and schools, we stand a real chance in putting a dent on food insecurity. This community effort and ownership of the issue means making a real difference, one truckload at a time.

What do you think? What kind of collaboration would you like to see in your community to fight hunger?

Champions for Kids SIMPLEGiving Program to Launch Nationally in Walmart Stores

Champions for Kids SIMPLEGiving Program to Launch Nationally in Walmart Stores

 

Champions for Kids & Walmart Plan Nationwide Program!

Labeed Diab and Julie Murphy wasted no time after being named 2015 Champions for Kids Torchbearers. They made the amazing announcement that Champions for Kid’s SIMPLE Giving Program will be extended to Walmart stores in all 50 states! The goal? To provide resources for more than 10 million kids throughout the United States in 2015.

Diab, Senior Vice President, President of Health and Wellness, Walmart Stores, Inc., and Murphy, President, Walmart West, Walmart U.S., excited nearly 300 attendees at the annual CFK Conference at Bentonville’s DoubleTree Hotel with their proclamation. Simple Giving was launched in 24 central Arkansas stores in 2013, expanded initially to three states, then 11 in the central region last year.

Ashley Taylor, VP International Strategy & Design Latin America, Walmart, and Kevin Pate, VP/DMM Consumer Electronics, Walmart, were Torchbearers in 2013 when the original goal was touching one million kids during the year. It was Taylor who secured the first 24 stores, then stores in a three-state area. The goal was surpassed with 1.2 million kids receiving resources that year.

Carol Johnston, Senior VP Central Plains Operations, Walmart, and Jack Sinclair, EVP, Food, Walmart, were the 2014 Torchbearers. Johnston paved the way for CFK to expand to 11 states in 2014, helping to exceed the goal Johnston and Sinclair set to help at least five million kids. It was a very lofty goal but was met in early November. The 2014 count currently stands at 5.3 million kids provided with resources needed to thrive.

What could Diab and Murphy possibly do for an encore? They provided an incredible vision and the means to achieve it! Citizens throughout the U.S. will be able to contribute resources directly to kids in their communities thanks to Walmart, Walmart suppliers and Champions for Kids.

RazorFest Grant Winners Celebrate with Champions for Kids

RazorFest Grant Winners Celebrate with Champions for Kids

Each year at RazorFest, Champions for Kids gives grants to organizations that work to improve the lives of kids, families and communities. Congratulations to the following organizations!

One-CommunityOneCommunity
OneCommunity is a non-profit organization founded in Northwest Arkansas whose mission is to promote communities working together to enhance the quality of life of all people through use of best practices and outreach services that improve health, education, and leadership skills.

Children’s Safety Center
Every year, hundreds of children in the Northwest Arkansas area are robbed of their dreams, robbed of their self-esteem and robbed of their childhood by physical and sexual abuse. Children’s Safety Center (CSC) is a child-friendly, family-centered facility, located in the JTL Shop in Springdale, AR that coordinates the complex investigation, prosecution and treatment services to these child victims of sexual and physical abuse in Washington County.

Yvonne Richardson Community Center The Yvonne Richardson Community Center is a non-profit organization which promotes educational and recreational activities for the multi-cultural population of Fayetteville, Arkansas. The center was constructed when a group of citizens felt a need to provide a safe, structured environment in which people would be given the opportunity to benefit from positive programs and policies.

Teen Action Support Network Teen Action Support Center (TASC) is a nonprofit organization that  encourage youth ages 13-19 to realize their full potential by providing free support services that promote the development of responsible and productive members of the community.

Life Source
LifeSource International is a non-profit organization in Fayetteville, Arkansas whose mission is to give a hand up,  not just a hand out. The primary objective is to instill positive values and living skills in children, adults, and senior citizens in a welcoming, non-threatening environment. All services are offered free of charge, to anyone in need of the service regardless of race, religious belief, language, or residency.

How Hunger Is an Educational Barrier

How Hunger Is an Educational Barrier

 

“You can’t teach a hungry child!”

How Hunger Is an Educational Barrier

Jamie* seems like a typical eight grade student, but carries around an unseen barrier. It starts in her Monday morning algebra class, when her stomach tightens with pangs to remind her she hasn’t eaten since the previous Friday. Fighting a slow burning sensation, she tries to focus on linear equations before heading to biology, where her stomach pangs become nauseating cramps.

Jamie’s barrier to education—hunger—is something millions of kids struggle with, and what educators battle daily.  If a child is hungry, focusing on anything becomes an uphill battle both for the child and teacher. How can a child engage in classroom discussion, focus on homework or recall information without nutritional support?

The Clarksville-Montgomery County Education Foundation, a non-profit organization established to support the needs of the Clarksville Montgomery County School system, is a firm believer in the saying “You can’t teach a hungry child!”

Clarksville-Montgomery County Education Foundation exists to support the improvement of public education by providing the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System additional funding for the support of programs and initiatives that contribute to student achievement.

The organization plans to support their district’s 100% Graduation Program with the donation of snacks received through the Champions for Kids and the Walmart partnership. Many districts, including theirs, has a backpack program that helps send home snacks with students who may not have food over the weekend.

In addition to providing snacks for elementary and middle schools, the program also provides meals for high school students attending the organization’s Virtual High School program. Unlike a traditional school, the Virtual High School has no cafeteria.

“Some life circumstance out of their control may have brought them to the Virtual high,” says Candy Johnson, who works with the Clarksville Montgomery County schools. “But as a community we can still ensure that while they are in our care, they can have a snack to help them fully focus and achieve 100% Graduation in our district!”

What are your thoughts on hunger barriers in education? Share your own story, spread the word or find out how you can get involved in your community!

*Name changed